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Precise Human Measurement

At the Spine Research Institute, everything begins with quantitative measurements.  These measurements allow us to quantify the specific risks associated with a given job or individual so that we can provide a truly personalized solution.  The following is a list of some of the different measurement technologies that we use to drive our analyses.  The measurements from these systems can sometimes be used by themselves, but are often used as inputs to our personalized modeling platform.   


Lumbar Motion Monitor (LMM)Lumbar Motion Monitor (LMM)

The Lumbar Motion Monitor (LMM) is a patented device that can be used to monitor the motion of a person's lower back.  Measured motions can then be compared to large normative databases in order to assess injury risk in the workplace or to quantify a patient's level of impairment

What we have:

  • Over 20 LMMs, including wired and wireless models

Optical Motion Capture O-H-I-OOptical Motion Capture

Optical motion capture systems use a series of cameras and markers to track how people or objects move with sub-millimeter accuracy.  

What we have:


ElectromyographyElectromyography (EMG)

Electromyography (EMG) devices record the electricity that muscles give off when they are flexed.  We use this information to calculate dynamic muscle forces and to quantify muscle fatigue. 

What we have:


Force PlateForce Transduction

Force transducers are used to measure the external loads that an individual is exposed to.  This information is used to understand exposure risk, weight distribution, balance, or to validate internal load predictions.

What we have:


Lumbar Spine MRIPatient Imaging

Imaging technologies are used to help understand a patient's unique internal geometry.  We use this data to measure muscle sizes and locations, create 3D models of internal body parts such as vertebrae and discs, and understand relationships between internal components and external landmarks.

What we have:

  • Access to CT, MRI, X-Ray, Ultrasound

Structured-Light 3D ScanningStructured-Light 3D Scanning

Structured-light 3D scanners use light projection and sophisticated cameras to create CAD models of nearly any surface with sub-millimeter accuracy.  We use this technology to create full-body three-dimensional models, perform virtual dissections, and validate models that we create from CT and MRI.

What we have:


Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS)Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS)

In biomechanics, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) can be used to detect changes in muscle oxygenation that have been linked to muscle fatigue.  

What we have:


Functional MRI (fMRI)

Functional MRI (fMRI) measures brain activity by detecting associated changes in blood flow.  We use this technology to understand how mechanical loading and pain affect the brain.

What we have:

  • Access to state-of-the art fMRI facilities

Electroencephalography (EEG)

Electroencephalography (EEG)

Electroencephalography (EEG) systems measure electrical activity from the brain. We use this technology to quantify alertness, drowsiness, and cognitive workload.

What we have:


Pressure MappingPressure Mapping

Pressure maps use a series of individual force sensors with known areas and locations to understand pressure distribution.

What we have:


GoniometryGoniometry

Goniometers are used to measure joint angles. 

What we have:


3D Coordinate Measurement3D Coordinate Measurement

3D coordinate measurement systems can accurately quantify locations in space via a point-and-click method.  We use this technology to calibrate laboratory equipment, take accurate measurements during experimentation, and for reverse engineering.  

What we have:


Ultrasonic Motion TrackingUltrasonic Motion Tracking

Ultrasonic motion tracking systems use ultrasonic transmitters and receivers to measure 3D motion.  We use this technology as a low profile substitute for optical motion capture and the lumbar motion monitor during seating experiments.

What we have:

  • sonoSens

Inertial Motion TrackingInertial Motion Tracking

Inertial motion tracking systems use accelerometers and other sensing technologies to track how people or objects move.  They are especially useful when optical camera systems are not viable due to significant occlusion.

What we have:


ComputationComputation

Many of our models require significant computational power.

What we have:

  • State-of-the-art engineering workstations (x10)
  • Mobile workstations and high-performance computers (>10)
  • Access to the Ohio Supercomputer Center